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Advice on Buying a Classic Car

If your annual mileage is very low, you may be retired or live very close to your workplace, running a classic car as your only vehicle may substantially reduce your motoring costs.
You could even have free motoring.
If the car was manufactured before the 1st January 1973 there is no fee to pay for the road fund licence.
It is considered to be an historical vehicle.
Note that the regulations state the manufactured date, not the registered date.
So if your vehicle was registered just after January 1973, check the chassis number with the owners club or manufacturer to find out the date it was constructed.
If the car was built in 1972 or earlier then get a dating certificate for the DVLA to claim historical vehicle status.
However you still have to have an MOT and insurance, but you get a tax disk for no fee.
If your annual mileage is very low, you may be retired or live very close to your workplace, running a classic car as your only vehicle may substantially reduce your motoring costs.
You could even have free motoring.
Insurance can be much cheaper for classic cars as insurance companies know you are not a boy racer.
Ask your insurance company for a classic car policy, If they do not have such a policy then shop around.
Your car owners club may have their own insurance company or broker.
Whatever car you buy, you must join the owners club.
They will have contacts for spare parts and a mine of information about your car.
Your car may have an interesting history! Many years ago (before the internet) spare parts for unusual and old vehicles were a problem to locate.
Nowadays if you go on to Google, I think you can still get spare parts for Noah's Ark! There are 4 types of classic car you can buy.
Perfect, Original or restored.
Great, of you go, but you pay top dollar.
Running but requires some TLC.
This can be ongoing restoration whilst using the car.
Barn find, complete.
If you are handy with a spanner, great.
Basket case.
(car in pieces).
Big problem, you must check that you have all the bits.
Where do you buy your car? eBay is a good start but always view and check the car before you bid.
Look at classic car magazines and newspaper advertisements.
Unless you really know what you are doing, the first thing you need is a tame mechanic to check over the vehicle before you buy it.
Even if it costs you a few pints it is well worth it.
You can kick the tyres if you want to.
Why not use a future classic as your own car.
I have a 10 year old Rover 75, and I think this could be a future classic.
Other suggestions for future classics are a Golf GTI or MGTF.
Your classic car could also provide you with an additional income, such as wedding car hire or film and TV work.
You could have free motoring.
Michael T J Hawkins.

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