Business & Finance Corporations

How to Obtain EIN Information

    • 1). Check IRS listings to see if the number you have has a valid EIN prefix. If the Social Security number has one of the following prefixes (listed along with the issuing area), it's possible the number is an EIN: Andover 10, 12, Atlanta 60, 67, Austin 50, 53, Brookhaven 01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 11, 13, 14, 16, 21, 22, 23, 25, 34, 51, 52, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 65, Cincinnati 30, 32, 35, 36, 37, 38, 61, Fresno 15, 24, Kansas City 40, 44, Memphis 94, 95, Ogden, 80, 90, Philadelphia 33, 39, 41, 42, 43, 45, 46, 47, 48, 62, 63, 64, 66, 68, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 91, 92, 93, 98, 99, Internet 20, 26, 27, Small Business Administration 31.

    • 2). Search the free EDGAR database for 10-Ks, 20-Fs and other Security and Exchange Filings. The EIN will be printed on the first page of these documents, along with pertinent information about the EIN's owner.

    • 3). Search the free database GuideStar for Form 990, which lists non-profit EINs and other financial information.

    • 4). If you have access to company documents, the EIN may be listed on invoices (the EIN isn't kept secret, like SSNs).

    • 5). Search the number in the Internet and see what comes up.You might find the number on a website, in documents or in a public-records database.

    • 6). As a last resort, you can pay a firm like Lexis to trace the number for you. It will be able to tell you if the number is an EIN, and provide the name of the company that the number is assigned to.

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